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US B1 Breast Cancer Research Semipostal Perforation Variety?

 
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Posted 12/27/2011   6:44 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add wt1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Although there doesn't seem to be a catalog listing for it, these two used examples of Scott #B1 show distinctly different corner perforations. Is this considered a variety?



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Posted 01/03/2012   08:28 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Trainwreck to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
It is a collectible variety in my book. Thanks for posting. Now the search begins.
Scott doesn't provide minor catalog numbers for die cut differences, however, sometimes they note them. They noted all (or most) of the die cut differences with the 32c Flag over Porch stamp.

Cheers, Robert
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Posted 01/03/2012   12:04 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wt1 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I pulled this data off of a foreign website that apparently was reprinted from Linn's Stamp News back on 10/31/2005. Unfortunately the article text is intact, but the illustrations are not. Does anyone have the article that shows the various illustrations recited here?

Based on the description in the article, I believe that the text highlighted in red would relate to my first scan; the text highlighted in green the second scan. (I do not have an illustration of the other variety mentioned.)


Quote:
Breast Cancer semipostal has four die-cut varieties

By Jay Bigalke

In circulation since 1998, the United States nondenominated Breast Cancer Research semipostal stamp (Scott B1) was manufactured with three basic die-cut arrangements and one subvariety.

A Breast Cancer Research stamp, printed by Avery Dennison, is illustrated in Figure 1.

Collector Gregg Greenwald of Wisconsin provided the information on the varieties and sent examples of the stamps to Linn's.

Illustrated in Figure 2 are enlargements of parts of the stamps that show the different varieties.

To tell the difference, look at the top corners of each of the stamps.

On the top stamp, the die cuts begin with a straight line, and the die-cut pattern starts with a peak and ends with a peak.

The middle stamp of Figure 2 has die cuts that begin with a peak and end with a valley.

The die-cut pattern of the bottom stamp begins with a valley and ends with a peak.

According to Greenwald, there are two subvarieties of the valley-peak stamps (the one shown on the bottom of Figure 2), but they relate to the vertical die cuts.

On one stamp, shown in Figure 3, left, the vertical cuts at the left begin with a valley and end with a peak.

On the other, shown in Figure 3, right, the vertical cuts at the left begin with a peak and end with a valley.

If the left stamp of the variety is flipped 180 degrees, the die cuts match those on the other stamp. It is possible that the die cut mats were inadvertently flipped.

The orientation of the horizontal die cuts on the stamps is what specialist collectors call "peak-peak," "peak-valley" and "valley-peak" varieties, respectively.

"The peak-valley and valley-peak examples are both available in my area of the country [Wisconsin], but it appears that the valley-peak example is not as widely distributed," Greenwald told Linn's.

Die-cut varieties are known on other stamps produced by Avery Dennison.

A story about different die-cut varieties on the 37 Roy Acuff stamp was published in Linn's issue of Nov. 17, 2003. The 34 Porky Pig stamp issued in 2001 also has different diecut varieties, including one variety found only on the special die-cut pane that has nine stamps with die cuts and a single imperforate stamp.

Avery Dennison continues to produce the Breast Cancer Research semipostal. Linn's reported May 2 that more than 606.8 million Breast Cancer Research stamps have been sold.

As of September, only two plate numbers have been reported on the stamps. They are V111111 and V121111.

The die-cut findings support the possibility that printer and finisher Avery Dennison used three different die-cutting mats during its production of the Breast Cancer Research stamp.

Linn's is interested in the existence of additional die-cut varieties for the Breast Cancer Research stamp not reported here.

To report any findings, write to Jay Bigalke, Linn's, Box 29, Sidney, OH 45365-0029.
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Edited by wt1 - 01/03/2012 12:08 pm
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Posted 01/03/2012   1:23 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Trainwreck to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
wt1,
In the other thread where you posted the scan of the reprint Breast Cancer Research in a plate block of 4: Is that the second die cut variety, peak-valley across the top?
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Posted 01/03/2012   2:26 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wt1 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I don't think so (but I could be wrong). Here's a close up of the two top stamps from that plate block. I intentionally skewed the colors to highlight the die cut perforations:



It seems to me this looks similar to Scan #1 posted above -- that is, "peak-valley", however, I agree the corners are different.
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Edited by wt1 - 01/03/2012 2:27 pm
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Posted 01/03/2012   3:35 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Trainwreck to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The top edge die cut starts and ends with a short horizontal cut on all three stamps.
After the short horizontal cut:
Stamp #1 (with the wavy cancellation) starts with a peak, then ends with a peak, before the short horizontal cut at the right end (peak-peak).
Stamp #2 (with the sprayed on cancellation) starts with a valley and ends with a peak (valley-peak).
Stamp #3 (from the plate block) starts with a peak and ends with a valley (peak-valley).
You have all three die cut varieties mentioned in that article. All you need now is the sub-variety of the valley-peak die cut.

Cheers, Robert
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Posted 01/03/2012   5:42 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wt1 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for clearing that up (I think). I didn't even know I had all three varieties of die cuts. Only time will tell if more get created given that the sale of these stamps have again been extended to 2015, I believe.
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Posted 02/10/2014   10:38 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add oldtriguy1960 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I just love this hobby!

Okay, I had a few short moments to kill and did a google search on US stamp varieties. One of the hits was this thread about the B1 die cut varieties. Well, lately I've been getting several of these B1 used stamps so I thought I should re-visit my B1s and see how many of the varieties I have with the intention of putting one of each in my album.

To my surprise, I found 5 different die cut varieties!

One variety was very much more common than all the rest.

In the scan below, the top two stamps match the stamps in the scan at the beginning of this thread. The bottom 3 stamps are different die cuts. (You can count peak/valleys for yourselves)

Here's my census:
Top left = about 27 off cover, 0 on cover
Top right = 2 off cover, 1 on cover
Bottom left = 6 off cover, 7 on cover
Bottom center = 6 off cover, 3 on cover
Bottom right = 1 off cover, 1 on cover



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Posted 02/11/2014   09:00 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Trainwreck to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Nice collection. Thanks for posting. I think I have only two or three die cut varieties of this stamp. I'll have to keep an eye out now for that fifth variety.

Robert
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Posted 02/11/2014   6:18 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Riderontherain to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Are die cut varieties intentional, accidental, or incidental?
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Posted 02/11/2014   9:46 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add sdtom to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Very interesting to read about all of the variations. I have a couple of used and one mint for my catalog which is enough for me.
Tom
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