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Perforation Strengthening In Plate Blocks

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Valued Member
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Posted 06/08/2017   4:15 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add ananthveerappan to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Latest CherryStone auction lot description says
"1893 6c purple, bottom margin Plate No. and imprint block of eight, n.h. and post office fresh, perf. strengthening along the horizontal perforations, still fine and affordable plate block, cat. $3250 (Cat No. 235) "

When they say "Perforation Strengthening", any idea what they mean.

Is it just a fancy word like 'Regummed - expertly restored to full gum"
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Posted 06/08/2017   4:40 pm  Show Profile Check rlsny's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add rlsny to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
When I've seen attempts to strengthen perfs of blocks it has been little tiny pieces of hinges stuck in place to prevent separation, but since this says NH I guess it is something else. It's not a very satisfactory description.
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Posted 06/08/2017   4:47 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add revcollector to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
It might be anything from a touch of library paste to a homemade type of glue depending on who did it. Since they say NH, I assume that the work was done to the selvage outside the gum area. But that should have been made more clearly.
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Posted 06/08/2017   4:48 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ekbustad to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Googling on the term shows it to be something that they have used frequently before. If you really want to know before bidding, I would suggest asking them what it means.
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Posted 06/08/2017   4:55 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add hy-brasil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The perfs are backed, usually in places and not overall, with tiny strips or pieces of hinges or gummed glassine material. The paper has become rather dry and the perfs have begun to separate in a spot or spots. It's also called "sensible perf reinforcement", which it is, I suppose. You should be able to see this in the photo/scan of the plate block.

Some collectors and probably most dealers won't consider this NH, but will consider how many truly NH stamps are in the block in basing their valuation.

Sometimes the reinforcement was done by applying glue along the split. It's generally pretty obvious and ugly.
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Posted 06/08/2017   5:27 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Petert4522 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Ebustad seems to have the best idea - ask the folks who have it up for sale. Ask them for a scan of the back.


Peter
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Posted 06/08/2017   5:44 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add revcollector to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Getting a scan is always a good idea. How ugly it looks depends on the skill of the person doing it, there are some very good people out there. Whether it is NH or not probably depends on one's definition (and sometimes whether one's own money is involved). Some dealers will not know or care, and some will make a point of telling, just like in every area of philately.
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Posted 06/08/2017   7:19 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

For Interest:
Collodion Stains
Stains in the paper caused by collodion (a chemical substance), which is used to rejoin perforations in multiples. It may be found on single stamps. Shows in fluid as opaque white.
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Posted 06/08/2017   9:32 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ananthveerappan to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I didn't have an intent to bid on it and that's why didn't ask them.

Checking at the enlarged image again, it looks like the root cause of the stains in the front-center.



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Posted 06/08/2017   10:27 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add revcollector to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The perf holes between the stamps from just left of center across to the right are also squeezed from when they were "strengthened".
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Posted 06/09/2017   11:46 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Trainwreck to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
What's happened to the paper from the plate number and up? Looks wrinkled. Is that caused by the gum?

Robert
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Posted 06/09/2017   1:07 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add bookbndrbob to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Robert, I believe that over time the gum arabic gains and loses moisture from the atmosphere, eventually causing it to contract. This either wrinkles the paper, or causes it to curl in cases where it is stored loosely. I am not a gum expert...just following logic.
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Posted 06/09/2017   1:08 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jarnick to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Collodion has been used to strengthen perforations but may discolor over time.
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Posted 06/09/2017   2:21 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Dry Tech to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Not sure that NH means much, at least value wise, when the PB is in this condition. Poor guy was born without much going for him and time hasn't been kind.
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Posted 06/09/2017   2:38 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add revcollector to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Since they are opening it at about 15% of NH value and it is not worth much more, it will be interesting to see if it sells.
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Posted 06/09/2017   7:35 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add hy-brasil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Since they are opening it at about 15% of NH value and it is not worth much more, it will be interesting to see if it sells.

The blind perfs and the range of perf hole sizes and orientation make it interesting for study. Still, 15% of the hinged price might be more like it.
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