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Pillar Of The Community
Canada
4573 Posts
Posted 06/24/2013   12:12 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add Bujutsu to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
For a number of years, I have had different postcards come my way and some of them have very interesting topics.

One topic I have a lot of cards for are old hotels. I was thinking of getting historical information about them but decided to face reality and come to the fact that it is beyond my budget, but, most of all, no room for all of them.

So, I thought I would scan some of these cards for you to view.

You have to admit, these old hotels had class. Current hotels / motels don't even come close I'm afraid. If you were dining on one of these hotel restaurants, you would really feel surrounded by luxury.

Anyway, here are some views. I have literally 100s of old US cards.

Will be posting more later.

Chimo

Bujutsu



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Pillar Of The Community
Canada
4573 Posts
Posted 06/24/2013   1:05 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bujutsu to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here are a few more hotel cards.

I believe that in the days these cards were published, some of them could have been available free as 'rack cards' (?)

Chimo

Bujutsu





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Bedrock Of The Community
United States
12128 Posts
Posted 06/24/2013   1:09 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wt1 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here's another view of the Hollenden Hotel in Cleveland back in the day -- alas, it was demolished in 1962:



Here's an excerpt from the history of Cleveland about it:


Quote:
The HOLLENDEN HOTEL, once the most glamorous and colorful of Cleveland's hostelries, opened on 7 June 1885. It was the first large hotel for transients east of PUBLIC SQUARE and offered accommodations for permanent residents as well. LIBERTY E. HOLDEN purchased land from Philo Chamberlain and formed a corporation to build the 8-story Hollenden Hotel at Superior and Bond (E. 6th) St. It boasted electric lights, 100 private baths, and fireproof construction, a lavish interior with paneled walls, redwood and mahogany fittings, and crystal chandeliers. Politicians claimed the dining room and made it famous as a meeting place. The hotel hosted 5 presidents, industrial giants, and celebrities of stage and platform.

In 1926 a $5 million annex was built on the east side of the hotel, and the main building was modernized. The hotel had several owners over the years until the 600 Superior Corp. bought it in 1960, but two years later, with only about 350 of the 1,000 rooms in use, the owners closed the Hollenden and demolished it. The 600 Superior Corp., along with developer Jas. M. Carney, then built a new 14-story, 400-room Hollenden House and parking garage on the site, which opened in Mar. 1965. The Hollenden House did not survive the decline of downtown Cleveland, and when it became unprofitable in the mid-1980s, Carney closed it permanently in May 1989. Later that year the relatively new building was demolished, making room for developer John W. Galbreath to build a 32-story office building.


Interestingly, the owner of the hotel back in the day, Liberty E. Holden, was also the owner of the city newspaper, Cleveland's Plain Dealer.
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Edited by wt1 - 06/24/2013 1:11 pm
Bedrock Of The Community
United States
12128 Posts
Posted 06/24/2013   1:21 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wt1 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Those postcards of the LaSalle Hotel in Chicago during its earliest days makes one shudder when you consider in 1946 it fell victim to a tragic fire in which 61 lives were lost. At least the tragedy resulted in some significant reforms in hotel fire safety, many of which we take for granted today:


Quote:
On June 5, 1946, a raging fire at the stately, luxurious, and upscale LaSalle Hotel, at the northeastern corner of LaSalle and Madison Streets, claimed the lives of 61 people, including numerous children and one of the firefighters. The 23-story hotel was erected in 1909 and trumpeted as the most modern hotel in the country outside of New York City. Emblematic of a new age in the hospitality industry, it offered guests bell-hop services, a barber shop, fine dining, evening entertainment, and a host of other services. Its Blue Fountain Room was a favorite watering hole for the city's elite, and President William Howard Taft once turned the Presidential Suite on the third floor into a temporary White House annex during an extended stay in Chicago.

The fire started below ground in an elevator shaft at about 11:30 p.m. on June 4. The lobby was quickly engulfed in flames, and the fire spread upwards from two interior staircases. All 886 rooms were occupied at the time, and there was no sprinkler system. Some of the victims jumped to certain death from higher floors in the building, including a woman who leaped with a child in her clutches. Most of those who perished died from asphyxiation after opening their doors to plumes of thick black smoke. A first-aid station and makeshift morgue was set up down the street at City Hall. The hotel had apparently been cited for a host of fire code violations about a month before the fire, none of which had been corrected. In the wake of the tragedy, the City of Chicago implemented a host of new fire safety measures, including automatic alarm systems, the posting of evacuation instructions in all rooms, and the increased use of two-way radios.

The LaSalle Hotel was refurbished after the fire, but never recaptured its previous level of notoriety. It was ultimately demolished in 1976 to make room for the massive commercial office building located there today.
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Bedrock Of The Community
United States
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Posted 06/24/2013   1:28 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wt1 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here's a link to architectural points of interest in the Hotel Lafayette in Buffalo, NY. At least it still stands and continues in use today:

http://www.buffaloah.com/a/washngtn/391/index.html
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Canada
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Posted 06/24/2013   2:25 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bujutsu to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for all this information wt1

It is always interesting to see how the architecture changes over the years when remodelling is done.

Chimo

Bujutsu
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Posted 06/24/2013   2:30 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bujutsu to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Now I have a question to ask everyone.

I don't actively collect these postcards and a lot came my way and some as package deals in order to buy a collection. Most of these cards were bought over 30 years ago. IOW - they are not costing me anything and I don't intend on buying more unless some come my way in larger units.

My question now is: Because I already have these cards, do you, the SCF members, think I should keep them? I ask this because I don't know any other collectors who want these for trade. So, I am thinking of getting the history on these hotel cards and mounting them in a binder?? Who knows? Maybe somebody would be interested in them as a complete unit??

What are all your views on this?

Chimo

Bujutsu
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Posted 06/24/2013   3:09 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bujutsu to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
One more hotel card for the day.

This is another colour lithograph card and is unused. Published in the 1930s

Chimo

Bujutsu

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Posted 06/24/2013   5:37 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wt1 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
On a comical note, the Stevens Hotel postcard says "3000 OUTSIDE rooms". Taken literally, that would be mighty cold on Chicago's Lake Michigan!

Back to the history of the hotel, here's quite an interesting story about it from its construction to the present day. It was financially strapped during most of its history and even led to criminal charges against the owner(s). (Just be careful to note that a few paragraphs are replicated at the end of the blog.). Nevertheless, the most interesting piece ... the rest of the story ... is to note that Former US Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens was the grandson of J.W. Stevens, the original owner, for whom the hotel was named:

http://open.salon.com/blog/laura_wi...otel_chicago
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Posted 06/24/2013   7:38 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bujutsu to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Fantastic story wt1

That hotel definitely had more than its' share of bad luck in spite of the fact that there were so many whose who attending as guests.

I guess some places are just destined to be a 'pig in a poke' as they say <G>

Chimo

Bujutsu
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Posted 06/25/2013   1:57 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bujutsu to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here are some more hotel cards.

I have more to show too if everyone wants to see them?

Chimo

Bujutsu



















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Edited by Bujutsu - 06/25/2013 1:59 pm
Pillar Of The Community
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Posted 06/25/2013   2:04 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bujutsu to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Some more cards

Chimo

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Pillar Of The Community
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Posted 06/25/2013   2:11 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bujutsu to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here is the last of my US hotel cards.

I don't get the chance to share my hobby locally because we live in the country and our local club meets only once a month but, it is enjoyable for me to share the images in this forum.

Chimo

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Learn More...
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Posted 10/14/2013   07:51 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stampfan9 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
One more for the topic.



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Posted 10/14/2013   08:10 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wt1 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
What's weird about that postcard, is that it depicts the "old" Monticello Hotel that was destroyed by fire on New Year's Day 1918, yet the postmark is dated December 13, 1918. The hotel was later rebuilt but did not open until 1919:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Monticello_Hotel


Quote:
The Monticello Hotel, which opened at the corner of City Hall Avenue and Granby Street on September 27, 1898, was the largest and finest hotel in Norfolk for over 60 years. The hotel was built on filled land. By 1885 Town Back Creek had been filled to Granby Street. Construction of the hotel spurred additional development along the new City Hall Avenue. The hotel suffered a devastating fire on January 1, 1918. In addition to the flames, fire fighters had to deal with bitter cold and ice. When it reopened in 1919, two additional floors had been added, including a large dining room and horseshoe-shaped ballroom known in later years as the Starlight Room. This became a favored location for balls, dances, and community events. The grandly appointed mahogany bar doubled as a billiards parlor during Prohibition. During the 1933 hurricane, the hotel and a broad area of downtown suffered considerable flood damage. The Monticello Hotel was the first building in Norfolk to be imploded in January 1976 to make way for the Norfolk Federal Building now on this site.
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Edited by wt1 - 10/14/2013 08:15 am
Rest in Peace
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Posted 10/14/2013   08:24 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add I_Love_Stamps to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I'm looking for a Dimeling Hotel in Clearfield, Pa. used with contemporary cancellation and stamp.

The Dimeling Hotel, Clearfield, Pa. Postcards.

These are just examples and not part of my collection. I am going to buy one however.



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