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Storing Large Used World Wide Collections

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Pillar Of The Community
United States
1953 Posts
Posted 12/07/2014   9:04 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add shermae to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I am curious to hear about how collectors working on large used world wide collections keep and/or mount their collections. The idea of collecting used stamps in heavily illustrated albums is intriguing, but the work required to hinge all those stamps seems daunting. very interested to learn more.
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Valued Member
United States
248 Posts
Posted 12/07/2014   9:56 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add pk-short to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I find that keeping to small groups of stamps makes it easier. Even if I purchase a large lot, I'll break it down and only work on a small group of stamps at a time (under 100 or even 50 to make it possible to work through in a few hours). World-Wide make their way into my Scott Internationals. If there are mounted pages past 1965 that fit in a 8x11 binder, I simply add them to an existing binder. Australia and US get added into my specialized collection. As I find duplicates, I identify and put them in to envelopes into a duplicates box. Every so often, I'll sell off duplicates.
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Pillar Of The Community
United States
2009 Posts
Posted 12/07/2014   9:58 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add TheArtfulHinger to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I've got a couple shelves full of albums and I uses hinges for probably 98% of the stamps in them. It's the cheapest mounting method and is just fine for used stamps. As far as the work required, I just mount stamps as I acquire them. Sometimes they accumulate, but it's pretty unusual that I mount more than one to two hundred stamps at a sitting. If I know where they need to go, I can have that done in under an hour. It can take longer if I have to hunt for the right space. There are only two instances when I use mounts instead of hinges: for mint never hinged stamps (and I'll even hinge those sometimes if they're of the dirt cheap, really common variety) and for more expensive stamps (even if used or previously hinged). The mount adds an extra layer of protection and it removes the possibility of causing a thin spot on the stamp when removing the hinge.
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Valued Member
United States
336 Posts
Posted 12/07/2014   10:25 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add landoquakes to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
200 stamps in a night would be a really productive one for me. Using hinges is no problem, finding where the stamps go is what takes up all the time. I will de-mount stamps and hinge them sometimes. I will use existing hinges on stamps too. I think I've hinged about 20,000 stamps in the past 5 years or so. I'll hinge mint stamps too. One must be careful when hinging mint stamps. Use moisture sparingly. I do prefer illustrated albums simply because it is easier to find where the stamp goes!
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Edited by landoquakes - 12/07/2014 10:27 pm
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United States
83 Posts
Posted 12/07/2014   10:52 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rascal to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I never thought of it as work. Like the others I always use hinges. I recently bought a pre 1940 ww collection with over 10,000 stamps. One country at a time. I give all the used stamps a bath and dry and press them in a drying book. I'm in no hurry. Today I simply spent about an hour with two mint stamps from Oldenburg. They both had CV of over $500 each so I was pretty sure I had counterfeits. It took a lot of searching on the net but they were fakes. So now I have a new page in my album for Oldenburg counterfeits. I'm happy with that. It will take me a year or more to finish this collection. Having fun.
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United States
2643 Posts
Posted 12/07/2014   11:28 pm  Show Profile Check eyeonwall's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add eyeonwall to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
stockbooks are an alternative option - less work, but more expensive
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India
125 Posts
Posted 12/07/2014   11:30 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add palaniappan to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
i do a lot of washing, drying and flattening of stamps on weekends. I have lots of stamps from all over the world. I just keep them in stock pages country wise. I do not mount them with a hinge. Since I do not have illustrated pages or a illustrated album. Hence I stick to the self made stock pages. I do not purchase ready made stock pages. I make all my stock pages in my free time. I will buy stamps rather than the stock pages.

warm wishes.
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Valued Member
United States
59 Posts
Posted 12/07/2014   11:37 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add lkkoller to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I do USA only but have the same problem too. I have 4-5 thousand stamps I have accumulated over the past 40 years or so. I bought my first album just this past week! I have made it my mission to mount (with hinges) 50 stamps per night. Sometimes I do more, but DO NOT FORGET to look at the earlier thread about NOT messing with your stamps when you are tired! LOL. I am a school teacher and have a 2 week break coming up soon, so I plan to get a LOT of stamps mounted during that time. Just have fun and DO NOT let it become work.
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Finland
751 Posts
Posted 12/08/2014   01:24 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add scb to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I use stock books all the way to store my collection (approx. 90K face different items + 25-30K varieties). They're cheap, efficient and scale up somewhat easily (though stock pages would be even better, but considerably more expensive option). I've written quite a bit of about it my blog http://www.stampcollectingblog.com , most stamp storage / organization related entries are filed under the 'basics' category at http://www.stampcollectingblog.com/...cting-basics

-k-


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Collecting the world 1840 to date one stamp at a time.
Author & owner of Stamp Collecting Blog
Edited by scb - 12/08/2014 01:25 am
Pillar Of The Community
United Kingdom
5675 Posts
Posted 12/08/2014   06:23 am  Show Profile Check GeoffHa's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add GeoffHa to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
For pre-1936, I keep my mint or used in an Imperial album (for GB & Empire) and an Ideal (for foreign). Both are fast-bound, so can present some challenges. I always hinge used stamps unless they're frail or potentially worth real money. Later GB and Empire I keep in printed GVI and QEII albums. These are ring-bound and springback respectively, so are more amenable to adding further pages.

Which leaves all the rest, which is a real ragbag. I have a number of printed country albums of the Lighthouse/Lindner/Kabe/Schaubek type, picked up at with stamps auctions (I never buy them new -too expensive). These house the post-1936 foreign material and any used examples of earlier stuff where the mint copy is in the Ideal. I also use ring, peg or springback binders where I have a good range of a particular country, but no printed album. Hagner sheets with stamps for which it's not worth making up pages can be slipped in at the back. Other material - "collection, but not in an album", I keep in stockbooks (again, usually picked up as part of auction bids).

The whole is a "system" that is intelligible to me, but probably no-one else!

Regards.

Geoff
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United States
5360 Posts
Posted 12/08/2014   08:18 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add floortrader to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Each collector keeps their collection in a way to their own liken . Mine is kept first in albums ,then 102 dealer cards and all loose material in stock books . I have a decent size collection that I hope to expand over the next 20 years .
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United States
364 Posts
Posted 12/08/2014   09:26 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add knuppster59 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Segregation is key. As other have said, I take a stock card or two per sitting and work through them. If not, looking at a lot of 400 stamps can seem overwhelming!

Storage methods vary, but I have specialized albums for my US (Mystic Heirloom), Canada (Steiner), and Berlin (Steiner) collection. Other WW stamps get put into either my Scott International Junior album (pre-1940) or the generic Voyager album. I hinge almost all of my collection except for the US which is mounted.
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United States
103 Posts
Posted 12/08/2014   3:12 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add locobot to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Another thing to consider is space. When I chose my format for my collection I underestimated the space requirements for my collection. A comprehensive world wide collection can get very large really quickly. I have had to stop printing Steiner pages due to running out of space. So I use the Steiner pages for 6-7 of my favorite countries and use an old 2 Volume Harris Citation album for my world wide collection, which has expanded to 10 volumes with supplements and blank pages.

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1447 Posts
Posted 12/08/2014   4:02 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Jkjblue to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
. I have had to stop printing Steiner pages due to running out of space.


My 1840-1940 WW ( -1952 British Commonwealth) classical collection takes up some 6,500 Steiner pages in 44 1 1/2" binders. That is 8 1/2 feet of shelf space, which is do-able, provided one has the room.

A full WW collection on 80,000 Steiner pages would take up 104+ feet (31.5 meters) of shelf space.
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Classical era collecting with the Blues
http://bigblue1840-1940.blogspot.com/
Edited by Jkjblue - 12/08/2014 4:04 pm
Pillar Of The Community
United States
526 Posts
Posted 12/08/2014   6:27 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Hieronymus to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Jim,

What weight paper did you use for your 6500 pages? I have printed out on 65lb paper most of the Steiner classic pages plus pages up to 1960 for not a few countries.

They take up about 39 Vario G dustcased binders and 11 dustcased Subway G & K Centurian Nassau binders--same basic style of binder but smaller, round rings and narrower spines than the Vario Gs. I ought to have an awful lot more than 6500 pages in my 50 mostly wider binders than you do in your 44 narrower ones. Yet I basically have the same 6500 plus those extras to 1960. But for all the Commmonwealth countries yours go to 1952, so I really shouldn't have a huge number more pages even given mine that go to 1960.

Is it that I printed on thicker paper or does your 1.5 refer to the diameter of the rings, not the width of the binder spine? Vario G squared "rings" measure 2". If your binder rings measure 1.5, my Vario G's hold 1/3 more paper than your 1.5s, which might perhaps be about how many more than 6500 pages I've printed in order to go up to 1960 for some countries. But the round rings in the G & K Nassaus probably are about 1.5 inches and thus 11 of mine are comparable to yours.

In any case, the Vario G dustcovers measure about 3.2 inches and the G & K Nassau dustcovers measure 2.75. Since the dustcovers, not the ring size, govern total shelf space, my total is about 13 ft.

But with all the other binders containing unmounted accumulations of album pages and stocksheets and all the stockbooks and other "stuff" my 13 ft of albums turns into 20+ feet of stamp collecting shelfspace--for now!


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Edited by Hieronymus - 12/08/2014 6:32 pm
Valued Member
United States
248 Posts
Posted 12/08/2014   9:36 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add pk-short to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Keigo - great blog, I have been following it for a while. Although I use primarily printed pages, even if I design them, you have some great ideas I have incorporated into my own collecting system.

Paul
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