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Question About A Scott 24 Type V On Cover

 
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Pillar Of The Community
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Posted 05/21/2019   10:13 am  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add gettinold to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hi

Looking at this stamp I see a few details that strike me as possibly odd. May be nothing unusual to those who've seen more than their fair share of these. Close up images of the top, right side & bottom ornaments hopefully are adequate for opinions:






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Posted 05/21/2019   11:13 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add txstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
If you are referring to the vertical side scratches on the right, those come standard on many Ty V's.

Those are actually on the relief on the transfer roll that way.

For the top of the stamp, I'm not 100% sure what you are asking about. Ty V's have a break at top and bottom - a large break.

The blotches in the middle of the stamp are bruises, also on the relief.
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Posted 05/21/2019   11:44 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add gettinold to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
txstamp

Thank you for your help. The letter O, S, & T at the top of the stamp have ink on them resembling the part of the stamp above the letters. Did not know what to make of this or if it was just normal.
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Posted 05/21/2019   11:57 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add txstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Yes, I see exactly what you are asking about. Interesting.

Not clear to me if that will be an inking variety or a consistent plate variety, so I'll defer to dudley, or similar, who is a good plater of the Ty V's.
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Posted 05/21/2019   12:03 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add gettinold to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
txstamp

Thank you again. Wasn't sure if this feature was out of the ordinary.
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Posted 05/21/2019   12:34 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add dudley to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for the shout-out, tx.

gettinold, marks and/or blurs in the top-label lettering of Type V stamps are common, but many of them are constant varieties as opposed to random inking phenomena. The marks in OS on your stamp are an example of a constant variety. It is position 66L8. There are other features identifying this position as well, such as the lines in the letters CE of CENTS.

PS. I'm envious if you are the owner of this cover. I don't have this position in my collection.


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Edited by dudley - 05/21/2019 12:38 pm
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Posted 05/21/2019   2:18 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add gettinold to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Dudley

I thank you for your expertise. I do own this cover. If you want it I'd be willing to part with it. Send me an e-mail and perhaps we can find some common ground.
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Posted 05/21/2019   3:18 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add dudley to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The image uploader doesn't seem to be working, but compare the image for 66L8 found on this page (use left panel to scroll down):

http://www.slingshotvenus.com/Frank...inFrame.html
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Posted 05/21/2019   3:53 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add gettinold to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Dudley

That is it. I'm also trying to upload some images for you regarding the cover and the link it has to Susan B. Anthony.
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Posted 05/21/2019   10:05 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add gettinold to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Dudley

The addressee on the envelope, and the name of the person the envelope was sent in care of, have an interesting connection to the Suffrage Movement.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franc...bolitionist)

The history is covered in greater detail in a book titled, The Selected Papers of Elizabeth Cady Stanton & Susan B. Anthony, Volume IV, When Clowns Make Laws for Queens. I've found some other resources online that I can post here. There is a companion piece to the cover in the OP. These were not obtained from a Stamp Dealer.













Francis Jackson got involved in the Suffrage Movement after witnessing what today would be called a parental abduction involving his grandchildren. He also attempted to leave money to the Movement in his will but a court overturned it with the reasoning the Movement was not a charitable organization. This is covered in the book referenced earlier in great detail.

The book also details the death of Lizzie Meriam's mother of typhoid. Lizzie Merriam Bacon took care of her mother in her final days and died of typhoid four days after her mother. Lizzie's mother left the greater portion of her estate to the Movement and left nothing in the will to Lizzie. Lizzie's mother reasoned that Lizzie already had plenty of money. That's also in the book.

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Posted 05/22/2019   5:59 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add craigk to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
gettingold-great stuff. Seeing the "$1 donation for John Brown", it appears Eliza F Meriam's brother, Francis Jackson Meriam was a fervent abolitionist and was actually with John Brown during the infamous raid at Harper's Ferry VA in 1859. He managed to escape but not without a bounty on his head which reached upwards of "thousands of dollars".

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Posted 05/22/2019   7:13 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Caper123 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The history behind the people/areas shown on old covers I have always found fascinating.
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Posted 05/22/2019   8:22 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add gettinold to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
craigk

Yes. I read about him. Died at the age of 28. He would have been on the raid but stayed behind due to his mental health issues according to the source.
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Posted 05/22/2019   9:22 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add gmot to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Very interesting background to these attractive covers - thanks for sharing!
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Posted 05/23/2019   6:53 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add gettinold to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
gmot

I agree. Less than 20 years ago much of the history behind a cover would have remained hidden. Information available online provides new insight into the background of a cover. The cover below has a link to the Yellow Fever epidemic that devastated Norfolk, VA in 1855.

https://www.historicforrest.com/nor...ghts/36.html




The cover is postmarked June 19, 1855. This is the date the ship Ben Franklin sailed into Norfolk. The ship had been held at an earlier port for 11 days after it was determined the crew were infected with Yellow Fever.

I attempted to identify the author of the letter but couldn't decipher the signature of the author or the recipient's notes regarding the subject of the letter.






A transcript of the letter:

Norfolk, June 18, 1855
Dear Sir
I have a negro woman in a very bad, deranged state, and I am compelled to do something with her, and consequently drop you these lines for instruction & general enquiry. First is there a vacancy for a servant or slave, Second, what is necessary for me to do to get her in the asylum, Third what is the expense per month, Fourth how am I or what course shall I adopt to secure the State for the payment of expenses, & Fifth the earliest possible chance of getting her there. Your prompt & immediate attention to the above with much oblige. Very Respectfully...balance illegible.

The letter is addressed to the Lunatic Asylum in Williamsburg, VA. This facility was the Country's first mental health facility.





In an attempt to determine the identity of the author of the letter I wrote to the Norfolk Historical society and received a response...



I searched the name suggested and found...



Died in September 1855 at the age of 37. No cure for Yellow Fever today. Just a vaccine according to the CDC...

Found this on Google:

Among the thousands of persons who died with the fever, Mr. Forrest particularly mentions the following: Jno. G. H. Hatton, President of the Select Council ,. Alex, Feret, of the Exchange Bank; Ignatius Higgins, teller of the Virginia Bank; W. E. Cunningham, Senior Editor of the American Beacon; Wm. D. Boberts, delegate elect to the Legislature; Richard Gatewood, Jr., of the Norfolk Beacon ; Wilson B. Sorey, U. S. Deputy Marshal;

https://www.usmarshals.gov/history/...lave_law.htm

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Edited by gettinold - 05/23/2019 8:28 pm
Valued Member
Canada
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Posted 05/23/2019   8:38 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add gmot to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Fascinating!

Possible reading of recipient's note - "Sorey's female slave [unknown] June 21st 1855"?
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