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The De LA Rue Stamps Of New South Wales

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Posted 04/21/2021   05:28 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bobby De La Rue to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi fairdinkumstamps,

I don't have an example of the first type, in which the word To, under the word Address, is in script type.

The serifed type, as shown above, was also introduced in 1875, so I'd imagine the first type isn't at all common.

I'll have a look tomorrow to see if I have an image.
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Posted 04/21/2021   05:42 am  Show Profile Check fairdinkumstamps's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add fairdinkumstamps to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
'The Asian Philatelist' provides an image and some limited information here:

http://www.asianphilatelist.org/sta...c/1875A.html
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https://www.fairdinkumstamps.com Fair Dinkum Stamps - Specialising in stamps from early Australia and the colonies, Australian philatelic literature, catalogues, stockbooks and accessories.
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Posted 04/21/2021   5:02 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bobby De La Rue to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks fairdinkumstamps
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Posted 04/22/2021   5:26 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bobby De La Rue to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Part 9

SPECIMENS AND REPRINTS


Of the London printings, imperforate plate proofs of the 2d no watermark, in the issued colour, are known with the word Specimen in manuscript, either diagonally across the stamp or horizontally towards the base.

The 1d no watermark, perforated 14, is known overprinted SPECIMEN in a tall heavy sans serif type.

The 1d watermarked single-lined 1, and the 2d no watermark, both perforated 14, are known with a lighter shorter sans serif type overprint. This overprint is also known on imperforate plate proofs of the 4d no watermark and the 10d watermarked single-lined 10 values, in their issued colours.

A seriffed overprint is known on the 1d watermarked single-lined 1, and the 2d no watermark, both perforated 14, as well as imperforate plate proofs on watermarked single-lined 4 or 10 paper, in their issued colours, of the 4d and 10d values.

The above overprints were applied in London and are all rare.

Of the Sydney printings, the first issue of specimens was made in December 1870 when 120 of the 1d, 2d, 4d and 10d were produced with a sans-serif upper case overprint in black, placed diagonally across the stamp, reading upwards from the lower left corner. In the printing quantities stated in Basset Hull, there is a note that a sheet of the 1d and 2d were overprinted, which would be 240 stamps rather than 120. A further 1560 stamps of all four denominations were overprinted in the same fashion in March 1871. The 1d, 4d and 10d are known imperforate.

In March 1872, 720 6d and 9d stamps were produced with a seriffed upper case overprint. The overprint on the 6d was in black and on the 9d in blue. Later, the 1d, 2d, 4d and 10d were produced with a slightly heavier overprint, again in black. The total produced is unknown. The 1d and 4d are perforated 13x10 line and watermarked small crown. The 2d and 10d were part of lot 1259 of the Bell collection, auctioned by Prestige Philately in May 2013. The 10d has the single-lined 10 watermark and is perforated 13 line. The 2d appears to be perforated 10 line and most likely has the small crown watermark.

In June 1876, 1200 of the one shilling issue were produced with a lower case seriffed overprint in red.

In November 1888, 240 of the 1d, 2d, 4d, 6d and 1/- along with 240 of the OS issues of the same denominations were overprinted with a similar overprint to that of 1876. As previously the overprint was in black, except the one shilling which was in red. These stamps have the large crown watermark.

Of the normal stamps, the 1d, 2d and 1/- are perforated 11x12 comb, and the 4d and 6d are perforated 10 line. Of the OS stamps, the 1d, 2d and 4d are perforated 11x12 comb, and the 6d and 1/- are perforated 10 line. Basset Hull states that 240 of the 9d and 10d without OS were also produced but I have not seen an example of either. They are not listed by Hutson and were absent in the Bell and McCredie collections.

In April 1891, 1800 each of the 9d and 10d, and 600 each of the 9d and 10d OS issues were made with a slightly longer overprint than was used in 1888. The 9d has the small crown watermark and the 10d the single-lined 10 watermark. The 10d was perforated 13 line.

Of the normal stamps, the 9d exists with a blue or black overprint perforated 11x12 comb, as well as perforated 12 line with the blue overprint. Hutson stated that the stamp perforated 10 line may exist. Of the OS stamps, the 9d with the blue overprint exists perforated 10 line and 12 line.

In March 1892, 2400 of the now obsolete 1d, 2d, 4d, 6d and 1/- were overprinted REPRINT in seriffed capitals. The 6d was perforated 10 line and the other four values were perforated 11x12 comb.

The first postcard type is known with a specimen overprint in small seriffed type. This card overprinted OS is known with a specimen overprint in manuscript.

The 1d envelope and the 1d newspaper wrapper are known with two types of specimen overprint, one in sans-serif capitals and the other in seriffed lower case.

Both telegram forms are known with a specimen overprint in seriffed lower case type with a full stop after the word.


Specimen and reprint types
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Posted 04/25/2021   5:17 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bobby De La Rue to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Part 10

DIE AND PLATE PROOFS


All die and plate proofs known to me have been listed below, by order of denomination. Many die proofs were produced on glazed card measuring 92x60mm so to save repetition this is the size unless stated otherwise. Plate proofs are always found imperforate.

One Penny: Four different stamp size progressive die proofs in black; die proofs in black on undated glazed card, in pale red on undated glazed card, in black on glazed card dated "Jan, 10. 1870" and in black on very thin paper 44x45mm. The Tapling collection contains a strip of six plate proof in black.

Two Pence: Five different stamp size progressive die proofs in black, die proofs in black on glazed card dated "Jan 1862", in black on glazed card dated "Jan, 10. 1870" and in blue on undated glazed card.

Four Pence: Stamp sized die proof in black on card with a stamp sized die proof of the 10d in black and both affixed to small card, die proofs in black on undated glazed card, in black on glazed card dated "April 16, 1867", in black on glazed card "Jan, 10. 1870" and in red-brown on undated glazed card. Plate proofs in red-brown on single-lined 4 or 10 watermarked paper.

Six Pence: Stamp sized die proof in black on card affixed to small card, die proofs in black on glazed card dated "Feb, 26. 1870", in black on glazed card dated "Feb, 26. 1870" and stamped "BEFORE HARDENING", in lilac on glazed card, in green on glazed card, in blue on glazed card, in pale brown on glazed card, in yellow-orange on glazed card and in carmine on glazed card.

The last six named are stated to have been produced by De La Rue for the 1872 Kensington Exhibition. If this is the case they must have been reproduced in some other fashion as the die was in Sydney. Basset Hull notes that two plate proofs were produced on watermarked paper prior to the stamp being issued however the colour is not stated.

Nine Pence: Perforated proofs on very thick unwatermarked ungummed paper and perforated 12 comb are known in various colours. A set of 10 was in the Carrington collection and a set of 12 was auctioned by Mossgreen in April 2015. They are identical to the one shilling stamp with the exception of the words "NINE PENCE" in place of "ONE SHILLING". These proofs are on the same paper as the colour trials for the record reign values, which must've been produced between April and June 1897.

As mentioned above, the fourth printing of the usual 9d stamp was made in January 1897 and a fifth printing was made in June 1900. I would suggest that at some stage in mid 1897 the Government looked into producing a 9d stamp derived from the one shilling die, but obviously did not proceed with this course of action.

Ten Pence: Die proofs in black on glazed card, in black on recessed glazed card dated "May 1, 1867", in black on glazed card dated "May 1, 1867" and stamped "BEFORE HARDENING", in black on glazed card dated "May 2, 1867" and stamped "AFTER HARDENING", in lilac on glazed card and in lilac on glazed card and endorsed "6d Postage". Plate proofs are known in lilac on on single-lined 4 or 10 watermarked paper.

One Shilling: Stamp sized die proof in black on card affixed to small card (a die proof of just the vignette is attached to this card also, progressive die proof on glazed card dated "Aug. 11. 1875", die proofs in black on glazed card dated "Aug. 13. 1875" and stamped "BEFORE HARDENING", in black on glazed card dated "Aug. 17. 1875" and stamped "AFTER HARDENING", in black on small recessed card, in blue on glazed card, in mauve on glazed card, in green on glazed card and in brown on glazed card.

A plate proof in bright green on unwatermarked paper was sent to Sydney by De La Rue with the die and plate. A plate proof in dull green on paper watermarked small crown was produced in Sydney. Plate proofs on unwatermarked paper in red are also known.

A proof sheet of the newspaper wrapper, in pale vermilion, was attached to a communication from the Inspector of Stamps in February 1865. A proof impression is also known in black.
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Posted 04/26/2021   5:00 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bobby De La Rue to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Part 11

STAMP NUMBERS PRINTED AND ISSUED


In addition to the printing details already mentioned, the following information has been extracted from Basset Hull and the annual reports of the Postmaster-General.

Basset Hull provides printing numbers of all values to 1871. Thereafter, the 1d and 2d values are omitted from the totals. There were 21,600,000 1d stamps printed between 1863 and 1871, and 46,329,240 2d stamps printed between 1862 and 1871, of which 18,839,280 and 45,608,080 respectively were printed prior to the introduction of the small crown watermark paper.

The table below shows the number of 1d and 2d stamps issued between 1872 and 1888. The earliest known dates on the large crown watermark paper for these two denominations are 20 April 1882 and 2 May 1882 respectively. These stamps were superseded by the centennial release. The 1d was issued on 9th July 1888 and the 2d on 30th August 1888.





For the four pence, there were 990,000 stamps printed on the single-lined 4 paper, 960,000 on the small crown paper and 1,800,000 on the large crown paper. The September 1876 printing comprised 36,000 stamps on the single-lined 4 paper and 60,000 stamps on the small crown paper. The first printing on the large crown paper was in August 1882. The last was in April 1888. The 4d centennial was issued on 10th October 1888.

For the six pence, there were 4,730,640 stamps printed on the small crown paper and 6,240,000 printed on the large crown paper. The first printing on the large crown paper was in June 1882. The last was in October 1888. The 6d centennial was issued on 26th November 1888.

For the nine pence, There were three printings. The first in August 1871 comprised 60,480 stamps, 720 of which were printed on single-lined 2 paper. An imperforate vertical pair of the stamps printed on the single-lined 2 paper, once belonging to Leslie Hausburg and now in the Royal Collection, exists. The top stamp is overprinted NINE PENCE and the bottom with the numeral 9. Further printings, each of 60,000 stamps, were made in October 1873 and May 1876.

For the ten pence, there were five printings, each of 36,000 stamps, in September 1867, September 1868, October 1869, November 1870 and June 1872.

For the one shilling, there were 600,000 stamps printed on the small crown paper and 1,860,000 printed on the large crown paper. The first printing on the large crown paper was in September 1882. The last was in April 1888. The 1/- centennial was issued on 28th February 1889.

There were 115,992 newspaper wrappers printed in March 1865 that had the impression of the De La Rue stamp. In 1873 there were 1,611,600 wrappers issued. Newspaper postage became free on 1st January 1874, provided the publication was posted within 7 days of issue. That year, only 14,080 wrappers were issued by the GPO.

Reply paid cards were not in huge demand, with only 15,040 issued between 1883 and 1887. There were 2,847,394 post cards issued between 1875 and 1887.

There were 1,852,702 1d envelopes issued between 1873 and 1887. Only 8,900 were issued during the first seven years but by 1887 their number had increased to over 250,000 per year. There were 474,513 2d envelopes issued between 1881 and 1887.
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Posted 04/27/2021   06:05 am  Show Profile Check fairdinkumstamps's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add fairdinkumstamps to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Great work again, thanks Bobby De La Rue.

Could you please divulge your source for the issue numbers in the table?

Quote:
The table below shows the number of 1d and 2d stamps issued between 1872 and 1888.
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https://www.fairdinkumstamps.com Fair Dinkum Stamps - Specialising in stamps from early Australia and the colonies, Australian philatelic literature, catalogues, stockbooks and accessories.
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Posted 04/27/2021   5:06 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bobby De La Rue to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi fairdinkumstamps,

For the table, the annual PMG reports were the source of the information.

They are available here:

https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/h...ocument.aspx

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Edited by Bobby De La Rue - 04/27/2021 6:27 pm
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Posted 04/28/2021   03:09 am  Show Profile Check fairdinkumstamps's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add fairdinkumstamps to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Bobby De La Rue.

It's not easy to find them - I managed to find one in the sessional papers - do you have any further tips on their location from that link? I tried searching a few other sessional papers but no luck so far...
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https://www.fairdinkumstamps.com Fair Dinkum Stamps - Specialising in stamps from early Australia and the colonies, Australian philatelic literature, catalogues, stockbooks and accessories.
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Australia
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Posted 04/28/2021   4:48 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bobby De La Rue to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi fairdinkumstamps,

Taking 1895 as an example, use the link above and scroll down to the 17th Parliament (Jul 1895 - Jul 1898).

Click on the 1895 link for the LA Vote Indexes. In this case it's only a 39 page PDF. Under the heading 'POSTAL' at the bottom of page 24, at the right of the page you'll see it says volume 3 page 623.

Click on the link 1895-3 in the LA Votes section and download the PDF.

It would appear that not every year is there. I managed to find 1855, 1858-63, 1865-67, 1869-70, 1872, 1874-99. I haven't looked for 1900 or later years.

To extract the PMG report from the big PDF file, print the page range to file (the page numbers as reported by your PDF viewer, not the page numbers in the document) and save as a PDF. Everybody's system in this regard will have their variances.

Hope this helps

PS: Final section will be posted later today.
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Posted 04/28/2021   11:53 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bobby De La Rue to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Part 12

EPILOGUE


Between 1866 and 1870, the following numbers of stamps are known to have been destroyed: 1d 50,386; 2d 62,709; 4d 6,063 and 10d 25,440.

Under the Stamp Duties Acts of 1865 and 1880, postage stamps were authorised for use for various revenue purposes and can be found fiscally cancelled with ink or by rubber stamps of various companies.

In anticipation of New South Wales joining the Universal Postal Union, the 1d, 6d and 1/- plates were revived in January 1891 to produce d, 7d and 12d stamps, as well as d newspaper wrappers. They were printed in grey, brown and red respectively, and overprinted with the new value. There was only one printing of the two higher values, of 120,000 stamps each. The die of the one penny was used in 1892 to create the new d stamp and d newspaper wrappers. In 1899 the colour of both was changed from grey to blue-green.

In 1895, 1000 sets of the withdrawn OS stamps were produced for collectors, which included the 1d, 2d, 4d, 6d, 9d, 10d and 1/- De La Rue types. Of these, 900 sets were overprinted with the NSW in concentric circles cancellation. Only 159 sets were sold with the balance being destroyed.

The other 100 sets were overprinted with the GPO in concentric circles cancellation and 50 of these sets were additionally overprinted 'Specimen' in the same type as used in 1891.

When the McCredie collection was auctioned in 2011, the 9d and 10d stamps were described as being watermark large crown, but they were never overprinted OS with this watermark. The 9d appears to be perforated 11x12 comb but this stamp was not issued with this perforation gauge. The 10d is from the 1893 printing and appears to be perforated 10 line.

Both types of 1d postcard, as well as the 1d and 2d envelopes and both types of 1d OS envelopes were included in these sets.

In late 1898 the dies for the 1d, 2d and 4d stamps were destroyed, along with various plates and electros for these three values as well as the 6d and 1/- stamps.

I have four different commercial perfins on De La Rue stamps, including an example on a 1d pair dated 24th August 1885. The stamps are all watermark large crown.

The most common postage rates in use during this period are 1d for town letters, 2d for country letters, 4d (from 1868) for registration and 6d for letters to the United Kingdom.

For interstate letters, the charge was 6d until 1870, when it was reduced to 2d (overland) or 3d (by sea). From the 1st January 1874 the charge was 2d, regardless of the method of conveyance.

A wide range of cancellations can be found on De La Rue stamps. Among the rarest is the numeral 3 Sydney rideout machine cancellation, known on a pair of 2d dated 12th April 1862. Many different Sydney duplex cancellations and dumb obliterators, as well as numeral cancellations and sometimes circular datestamps from country Post Offices can also be found. Cancellations from other Australian colonies as well as foreign cancellations are also occasionally met with.


Various cancellations applied at Sydney



Country obliterators



Registration cancellations



Travelling Post Office cancellations



Interstate and Foreign Cancellations (Melbourne, London, Constantinople)





Two examples of revenue usage


Finis
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Posted 04/29/2021   02:08 am  Show Profile Check fairdinkumstamps's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add fairdinkumstamps to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Hope this helps


Very helpful indeed - much appreciated Bobby De La Rue.

Superb display of cancellations in the epilogue - including your favourite type!
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https://www.fairdinkumstamps.com Fair Dinkum Stamps - Specialising in stamps from early Australia and the colonies, Australian philatelic literature, catalogues, stockbooks and accessories.
Edited by fairdinkumstamps - 04/29/2021 02:19 am
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Posted 04/29/2021   04:22 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bobby De La Rue to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thank you fairdinkumstamps.

The rays cancels are my favourites, especially the 2R type. I have over 300 different rays type numerals on DLR stamps, not including multiple types from various offices. For example, Braidwood has 3 rays types.

That said, I have a soft spot for the Sydney type shown on the 1d pair, which I call the cartwheel type, only because of the similarity, however vague, to the George III cartwheel penny.

The only thing I haven't posted is the checklist, but it's in the PDF. Even then, the variety of shades would make a comprehensive checklist quite difficult to produce, and you have to draw the line somewhere!

Just to be transparent, every image posted by me is actually in my collection.

If anyone would like further information about these issues I'd be happy to assist if I can.
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Edited by Bobby De La Rue - 04/29/2021 04:24 am
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Posted 04/29/2021   09:29 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Conratulations on a fabulous dissertation Bobby,
Obviously a lot of work, time, and research has gone into it.

Deserves to be on "Stampsmarter"
I am happy to make a donation to Stampsmarter to have it on, providing you and Don consider it.
Well done.
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Posted 04/29/2021   4:41 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Bobby,

Very interesting. Thanks.
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