Stamp Community Family of Web Sites
Thousands of stamps, consistently graded, competitively priced and hundreds of in-depth blog posts to read
Stamp Community Forum
 
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some stamps?
Our stamp forum is completely free! Register Now!

Unexploded New Glue Booklet Question

 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 6 / Views: 202Next Topic  
New Member

4 Posts
Posted 05/02/2021   11:18 am  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add Kcm to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
As you see this is a new member's first post on the forum. If you read on, you'll discover how unqualified that member is. Please forgive and correct if this is a wrong approach on a wrong forum.

BACKSTORY/MY BRIEF HISTORY AS A STAMP COLLECTOR: I collected stamps in grade school as a member of a stamp club, but stamp collecting was long past by start of high school. Still fondness lingers. I purchased an old woman's U.S. collection in the late seventies because I didn't believe she was being offered a fair price and she was running out of time. It's been stored since then. I have not much familiarity with it.

STORY: Circa 1975 I was employed by NASHUA CORPORATION as a lab technician in their research and development lab. The company brass took on a pet project. They believed they could sell the U.S. BUREAU OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING on the idea of scrapping postage stamp booklets that used waxed paper to separate the pages with stamps coated with NASHUA's product: DAVAC adhesive. I was assigned to work on the convincing. Our first print run at the BUREAU produced two million booklets. Naturally, I purchased one as a keepsake. By the time the BUREAU made up its mind that a second, larger run was in order, the price of a first class stamp had risen, imposing more uniqueness to the earlier issue. The larger run won NASHUA the contract for DAVAC coated paper they craved. I believe, at the time, philately dubbed the species "New Glue". I stashed my keepsake, perhaps, in a far-gone file folder, perhaps with the very large collection, perhaps somewhere quite strange (as I am sometimes known to do) , nearly half a century ago.

QUESTION: Splitting time spent into half unpleasant work and half "My, my, what have we here?" all in creepy crawlspaces, assume it would burn fifty to one hundred of my remaining hours to locate the thing if I can at all, would an experienced philatelist deem such a dubious search worth my while?
Send note to Staff

Moderator
Learn More...
9258 Posts
Posted 05/02/2021   11:30 am  Show Profile Check 51studebaker's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add 51studebaker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Welcome.
Yes, in my opinion I would search your stash down.

Given your background, can you shed any light on what, if any, accelerate aging testing your company might have done? Does the USPS even care or have a specification for aging? Did the adhesives and/or coatings have any archival specifications or testing done on them?
Thanks
Don
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
New Member
4 Posts
Posted 05/02/2021   1:36 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Kcm to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Interesting enquiry! I left that lab in January, 1977.

NASHUA CORP. and DAVAC had a longstanding and excellent track record as a cheap to store and efficient label adhesive decades before the brass ever approached USPS. Theirs was a simple campaign to eat the wax industry's lunch.

The question before USPS was never "Would this work as well?" It was "Will DAVAC save money on our waxed paper bill without inviting new problems?"

The question before me and my fellows was "Can we dislodge this entrenched leviathan?"

The wax paper industry never recovered, so I observe.

Kevin
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by Kcm - 05/02/2021 1:38 pm
Pillar Of The Community
United States
2569 Posts
Posted 05/03/2021   9:34 pm  Show Profile Check eyeonwall's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add eyeonwall to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Were there any test booklets created for this project using something other than real postage stamps? (such as For Testing Purposes Only dummy stamps) If yes, did you save any of those?
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Learn More...
6148 Posts
Posted 05/03/2021   9:42 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rogdcam to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Interesting post that got me to looking and finding this:


Quote:
DAVAC Gumming A new gum from 1963 aided production of Gold Coins In issueDS31, your compiler used the term 'wateractivated' to describe the gumming used on the Tonga Gold Coins stamps. This is the term that is invariably used by stamp printers to signify stamps that require either saliva or a wet sponge to activate the gum on the reverse. This term was unfamiliar to more than one reader, so if you were one of them, it is now hopefully clear to you.
Space on the front page prevented full details of what was then a new gum type from being described, for while the Tongan issue was wateractivated for sure, it actually comprised a new invisible gum called DAVAC. The producers, Samuel Jones, wrote at the time.....
DAVAC is a clear, matt adhesive. Made and pioneered by Samuel Jones for Walsall's Tonga coins of 1963. A suspension of discrete particles of adhesive in a non-aqueous solution of a resin binder, which is then coated on a paper and the solvent dried off. This leaves a paper, on the surface of which lie the small individual particles of the water soluble adhesive anchored to the body paper by a small proportion of resin. On moistening, the binder permits the water to permeate through to the adhesive particles, so giving a tacky gummed film indistinguishable from normal gumming.
The advantage of DAVAC is that it does not cause the paper to curl under extreme climatic conditions. It also enables specialised papers and foils to be used, which could not normally be processed by mechanical non-curling processes.
The "mechanical non-curling processes" that are referred to above are the 'gum-breakers' used for normal paper production. The reel of paper is drawn across steel blades, or similar, under tension resulting in minute gaps between the particles of gum that allows the paper to expand or contract depending on climatic conditions without causing a curling of the substrate - the bane of postal counter clerks and collectors. On most stamps, this process is invisible to the eye when examining the gum on the issued stamp, but on some German, American and possibly stamps from other countries as well, there are colourless lines across the gum at intervals that serve the same purpose.
The Tonga gold-foil stamp substrate was too thick to pass across the steel blades without causing damage before printing, hence the new gum.
DAVAC was also used on two issues of stamps from Canada, but as these comprised normal thickness paper, it may explain why they did not continue with this gum type. However, it fails to explain why the Canadian printers ever bothered with DAVAC-gummed paper in the first place, as there are no obvious benefits when used on normal thickness paper


https://www.stampprinters.info/DS32.pdf
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
New Member
4 Posts
Posted 05/05/2021   09:10 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Kcm to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
@ eyeonwall asked:
Were there any test booklets created for this project using something other than real postage stamps? (such as For Testing Purposes Only dummy stamps) If yes, did you save any of those?
No, nothing of that ilk was in need of testing. NASHUA had been producing hundreds of thousands of miles of six feet wide rolls of DAVAC (and many other kinds) of paper every month 24/7 round the clock. The Quality Control Lab (where I hated assignment) kept the coat weight and composition stable. Hundreds of pallets of 6 foot by 6 foot cut sheets four feet high stored in the warehouse, loading docks, trucks in even high relative humidity never posed a problem; we never wondered how things would go in a four sheet 4 inch by 2 inch booklet. NASHUA's adhesive department was quite sophisticated. We led the industry in DAVAC and in hot melt adhesive labels (lay the label on a hotplate adhesive side up to liquefy the coating), and held our own in pressure sensitive coated paper.

Kevin
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
New Member
4 Posts
Posted 05/05/2021   09:21 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Kcm to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Nice bit of research @rogdcam, I must say. The author of the article needed to do more research DAVAC had advantages far more significant than that author notes. It was very kind to all the production machinery and personnel. I'm intrigued by the closing line.


Quote:
DAVAC was also used on two issues of stamps from Canada, but as these comprised normal thickness paper, it may explain why they did not continue with this gum type. However, it fails to explain why the Canadian printers ever bothered with DAVAC-gummed paper in the first place, as there are no obvious benefits when used on normal thickness paper.


None obvious to the writer perhaps. The curling mentioned on the earlier stamps was because the paper absorbed the air's humidity and expanded whereas the coating had to be formulated to resist humidity and refused to expand. The cuts the author mentions were in favor of gaining independence -- one from the other. DAVAC absorbed and shed humidity at the same rate as the paper needed to.

It is worth noting that in that era, the BUREAU could truck in adhesive coated paper at far less cost than to truck in the same quantity of waxed paper. Even more expensive at the time was the cost of producing the silicone coated release sheets we needed to protect pressure sensitive adhesive. The evolution of cheap release sheets brought today's pressure sensitive stamps to the forefront.

Kevin
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
  Previous TopicReplies: 6 / Views: 202Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.


Go to Top of Page
Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Stamp Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2021 Stamp Community Family - All rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Stamp Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Privacy Policy / Terms of Use    Advertise Here
Stamp Community Forum © 2007 - 2021 Stamp Community Forums
It took 0.17 seconds to lick this stamp. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05