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Booklet Versus Other Stamps

 
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Posted 02/14/2011   9:12 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add raywrio to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
OK what is the difference between a booklet stamp and other stamps? And how can you tell the difference?
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Posted 02/14/2011   10:07 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Russ to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The difference between sheet and booklet stamps is basically how the panes are cut and perforated. I will discuss this subject from U.S. stamps, hopefully someone else will share details from other countries.

Below is a typical layout for a 400 subject flat plate printing. The sheet consists of 4 panes of 100 separated by horizontal and vertical centerlines. The sheet is cut along the centerlines to produce 4 panes.


Below is a typical layout for a 360 subject flat plate printing. The sheet consists of 60 booklet panes of 6. The sheet is cut along all 4 sides of the panes of 6.



Below is a booklet and booklet pane (Scott 374)



As a booklet pane or a horizontal pair it is very distinguishable but the individual stamps would not be distinguishable from sheet stamps.

There are a variety of printing method and sheet layouts that were used for both sheet and booklet stamps. The degree to which the individual stamps can be distinguished varies.
Edit Typo
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Edited by Russ - 02/14/2011 10:08 pm
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Posted 02/15/2011   01:48 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Nice work, Russ.
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Posted 02/15/2011   10:01 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add raywrio to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Russ,

Thank you for the explanation but, don't you just hate the but!!???? But...

This is what I really want to know. Lets take one stamp from the sheet and one from the booklet, lets say the bottom right stamp from each. OK now how would I determine which one came from the booklet and which came from the sheet? Its understood that the stamps have been separated from the rest just for clarity.
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United States
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Posted 02/16/2011   12:37 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Russ to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
First, there are many different plate layouts for both the sheet panes and the booklet pane. These combinations result in considerable variance in the extent to which the booklet and sheet stamps can be differentiated.

Using the flat plate layouts shown above the perforations of each would be 11x11. Obviously all booklet pane singles would have at least one straight edge while the sheet pane (of 100) would only have 19 stamps with straight edges. The remaining 81 stamps from the sheet would be perforated on all 4 sides.

The positions shown in red would have one straight edge and those shown in blue would have two straight edges. The positions that may be distinguishable as either sheet or booklet are shown in a darker shade.


On the booklet panes the two positions above the horizontal arrow and the two positions left and right of the bottom vertical arrow can be cut in such a way where part of the angular arrowhead may be visible in the margin with a straight edge (positions 21-5, 30-6, 55-6 and 56-5). This is a combination that is only possible on the booklet panes.



On the sheet stamps the top row of the lower right and lower left panes will have a straight edge on the top which is not possible in the booklet stamps (positions 1-10LL and 1-10LR). This is a combination that is only possible on the sheet panes.

The bottom row of the upper right and upper left panes have nine positions per pane with a bottom straight edge and perforations on both vertical edges (positions 91-99UL and 92-100UR). This is a combination that is only possible on the sheet panes.

Additionally the two positions left and right of the bottom vertical arrow can be cut in such a way where part of the angular arrowhead may be visible in the margin with a perforated edge (positions 100LL and 91 LR). This is a combination that is only possible on the sheet panes.

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Posted 02/17/2011   5:39 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Russ to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Another type of identifiable booklet pane single would be from the 180 subject sheets. These sheets contained 30 panes of 6. The panes from the center row had a guideline between the first and second row of stamps. This produced singles with a straight edge on one side and a guideline in the perforations at the top or bottom. This was n0t posible with sheet stamps


180 subject plate layout


Scott 300a Booklet pane with guideline.
This plate layout was used for booklet panes for Scott 300, 301, 319, 331, 332.

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Posted 02/17/2011   11:07 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Russ to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The rarest and most valuable U.S. booklet pane single is from a Scott 583a position J pane from plate 17451. The on cover example shown below is valued at $4000-$5000.

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Posted 02/18/2011   7:40 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add raywrio to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Russ,
This is an interesting topic and I'm glad you responded.

Do you own that stamp?
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Posted 02/18/2011   10:34 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Russ to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
No, wish I did. The stamp is from plate 17451 which was paired with plate 17450 for the 2 plate stickney rotary press drum. These 2 plate were 360 subject booklet pane plates (583a). They were the first non-coil rotary plates produced and the only rotary press plates with the flat plate guidelines. Only one booklet pane (pos. H) and 3 singles (2 from pos. J panes and one from pos. H pane) have been certified. There are still some out there.
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Australia
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Posted 02/19/2011   02:16 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add MmmmBalf to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
It's interesting that Australian stamps don't have this problem. Sheets are printed with a gutter between the panes and the stamps are perforated on all sides, so if a stamp has a straight edge it's a booklet stamp.
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Posted 02/19/2011   6:35 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add raywrio to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Russ,

I've read terms such as die, rotary, drum, and plate. Is the a link that explains how stamps are/were printed. I would like to know also the difference between die and rotary. Thanks
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Posted 02/19/2011   6:54 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Russ to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I will put something together and post here that will help to explain some of these things
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Posted 02/20/2011   12:49 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Russ to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
raywrio,
Here is a little to help with the differences between the flat plate and the rotary press printing methods.

Flat plate
There are four basic steps in the flat plate process:
1. Inking
2. Wiping
3. Polishing
4. Pressure impression


Using the red position numbers:
As the plate pallet rotates from 4 to 1 it passes under the inking station where the plate is covered with ink
As the plate pallet rotates from 1 to 2 it passes through the wiping mechanism where the excess ink is removed
At 2 the printer uses the polishing block to force the ink into the recesses in the plate. He also uses the whiting to remove any ink from the top of the plate.
At 3 the paper sheet is placed on the plate.
As the plate pallet rotates from 3 to 4 it passes through the impression roller which presses the moist paper into the plate recesses and producing the printed impression.
At 4 the printed sheet is removed.

Below is a R. Hoe & Co. flat plate press from BEP. This one is printing currency but is the same presses that printed stamps. This press was a for plate press with the plate pallet rotated by chain drive from station to station. You will notice that the plates are completely flat.



Rotary press
There are three basic steps in the flat plate process:
1. Inking
2. Wiping
3. Pressure impression


With the rotary press a continuous roll of paper (web) was used. The paper was fed between the rotating plate drum and the impression roller where the print impression was made. Each revolution of the plate drum would print 2 sheets, one of each plate. As the plate drum rotated it was continuously inked and wiped. The paper would continue around the top of the press and was rolled up ready for gumming, perforating and cutting. With later machines the gumming and perforating were done on the press so all that was left was the cutting into panes.


Above is the 2 plate drum consisting og 2 semi-circular plates.


Above is a larg Stickney rotary press.
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Posted 02/20/2011   6:32 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

You're a legend Russ!
we are privileged to have access to your images
and knowledge.
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