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Counterfeit Postal Card Cut-out?

 
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Valued Member
United States
86 Posts
Posted 01/28/2020   3:41 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add hawkstamp to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Looking at my Postal Cards and reading about counterfeits I decided to look a little closer. One I found could be UX12 from 1894. Does anybody have more information on this? I'll appreciate any help!
hawkstamp (pete)






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2557 Posts
Posted 01/28/2020   3:46 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add John Becker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The quality control on printing many of the early postal cards was terrible. I have no doubt all of your examples are genuine.
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United States
341 Posts
Posted 01/28/2020   3:52 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add m and m to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
as John pointed out qc was poor. cheap fast drying ink and poor card stock were major contributors as well.
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United States
86 Posts
Posted 01/28/2020   4:03 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add hawkstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thank you, but I have a follow up question. Scott mentions in their description: There is a break in the upper line of the farthest "hairpin" in the line directly under the "N" or United.
Now< I have been looking for both the letter "N" and the word United in this cut-out. Can anybody help out and help me understand? Again, Thanks a lot. Pete
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Posted 01/28/2020   4:09 pm  Show Profile Check 51studebaker's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add 51studebaker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply


Don

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Posted 01/28/2020   4:51 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add GregAlex to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
From a practical standpoint, I can't see how counterfeiting 1 postcards could ever be profitable.
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United States
433 Posts
Posted 01/29/2020   09:54 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wtcrowe to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Below is the footnote from the UPSS Postal Card Catalog (2010 edition):

"N.B. At the time this and also S14 were in use, the Post Office Dept.warned that they had been "heavily" counterfeited. However, counterfeit
copies are extremely rare. Counterfeits are sometimes coated on one or both sides to give the impression that previous printing had been covered.
The arrest of Louis Smith in 1902, who also coated genuine cards as a legitimate business, ended the distribution of counterfeits. While the
generally poor quality of genuine copies of these cards makes counterfeits difficult to detect, all cards so far positively identified as counterfeits lack the bottom serifs of the second "T" in "STATES."

"One known group of counterfeits also contains an attested counterfeit of S15 in unused condition. It is mainly identifiable by the extremely poor quality of the paper. One postally used copy of this S15 counterfeit is also known to the Editorial Board (See Postal Stationery: Jul 1957, pg 8, Sep-Oct 1969, pg 314-315, Sep-Oct 1971, pg 128-132, and American Philatelist, Vol. 98, No. 2, issue dated February, 1984, for an article by
Frank B. Stratton. Also, see Postal Stationery: Nov-Dec 2002, pg 157-159; May-Jun 2002, pg 58-60; Nov-Dec 2001, pg 104-109; and May-Jun 1989,pg 73-78"

If Don's illustration is a postally used example of the counterfeit, it is quite rare. I own an unused example with printing on reverse showing that it was made in Chicago. 1 cents in the late 1800's was worth much more than now.
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Edited by wtcrowe - 01/29/2020 09:55 am
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United States
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Posted 01/30/2020   10:59 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add hawkstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Very interesting information. Thank you every one for the help.
hawkstamp
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