Stamp Community Family of Web Sites
Thousands of stamps, consistently graded, competitively priced and hundreds of in-depth blog posts to read
Stamp Community Forum
 
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some stamps?
Our stamp forum is completely free! Register Now!

Replica Stamps On Hipstamp

Next Page    
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 23 / Views: 1,846Next Topic
Page: of 2
Pillar Of The Community
United States
2570 Posts
Posted 01/04/2022   5:12 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add txstamp to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I have to admit that I am not a fan of replicas in general, due to the opportunities down the road of someone getting deceived.

In this case, the seller is clear that these are replicas.

I do wonder if in this case, if they were simply cut out of an auction catalog, or what?

https://www.hipstamp.com/store/fine-replica-stamps

This is an example of one of the lots currently for sale:
https://www.hipstamp.com/listing/us...ica/43472346

Send note to Staff

Pillar Of The Community
United States
7239 Posts
Posted 01/04/2022   6:04 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add bookbndrbob to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I'm the 'nosey' type, and although the title above the item states "details...", I don't see important details... most importantly whether or not each 'stamp' is indelibly marked faux, or replica on the back (or inconspicuously on the front).

This brings back memories of the "Hialeah forgeries" on eBay.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by bookbndrbob - 01/04/2022 6:05 pm
Pillar Of The Community
1104 Posts
Posted 01/06/2022   01:11 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add DrewM to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Most "replica" stamps or copies are not marked as such. At least not the ones I've seen, though some are. I've bought a few to fill spaces I'll never afford to fill with real stamps, and I've always marked the back with the word "copy" so no one who sells my collection or later owns such "stamps" will ever think they're real. But, honestly, almost none of the replicas I've seen in my entire 60+ year collecting career could ever be mistaken for a genuine stamp. They're too clean to be geniuine, printed on the wrong paper, lack a watermark, have very strange perforations (often made with something like a sewing machine), are printed in a color or shade that is incorrect, are obvious photocopies or otherwise not printed like normal stamps, and so on. And sometimes they're many of these. In fact, most of the few replicas I have bought (like the inverted 24c airplane or the high value Columbians) are very disappointing and are so badly printed they don't even look like real stamps. You might as well clip out a photo from an auction catalog or stamp magazine which would make for a much better "copy". I don't think any modern makers of replicas are doing what was once done which was re-engraving a stamp in order to make it look identical to the real stamp because it's printed the same way they were. Some of those older copies of real stamps are very well made, and those I do worry about. Modern makers of such stamps don't even deserve the title "forgers" since they just copy the stamp as cheaply as possible. If you're fooled by this, well, what can I say?

There are two types of stamp replicas, copies, or outright counterfeits that cause serious problems -- classic era copies that were made to be as close to the real stamps as possible so engraved and printed like them -- and modern counterfeit stamps intended to be sold to unaware customers for use as real postage. The first can cheat collectors spending a lot of money for classic stamps; the second can cheat buyers of postage and especially the government. Most stamp collector copies of stamps, however, are pretty obviously copies, at least in my experience. They are sold so collectors can put something into spaces they would normally never be able to fill. And yes they should be marked as "copies," though I think it's a little silly to even bother with the many that clearly are not real stamps.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by DrewM - 01/06/2022 01:36 am
Pillar Of The Community
United States
2570 Posts
Posted 01/06/2022   12:04 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add txstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
You make a good point about replicas - likely such as these - typically being not easily confused with the real thing. I agree with that.

Regardless, I do hope that they get indelibly marked for what they are.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
United States
1034 Posts
Posted 01/06/2022   2:18 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add mootermutt987 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
At what level of expertise, though, should they be 'obvious' fakes? At the skill level of a novice (crude reproduction)? Slightly below your own (not anyone in particular, but referring to the person, generally, asking the question) skill level? At the level of an expert (A truly beautiful fake, capturing all the glory of the original.)?

It is not inconceivable that a complete novice could spend, say, $100 on a nice stamp for their burgeoning collection, especially if it appears to be in decent condition and that $100 compares well to others of the same issue. I don't care whether the novice is a millionaire or a schoolboy - I suppose I hope he is a millionaire, but the point is that a rip-off is a rip-off no matter the ability of the victim to absorb the loss. Another way to look at it is that the millionaire may take his millions and pursue another hobby after discovering how stamp dealers/collectors have the moral capacity to rip him off with impunity.

In the 1980's when I was an auction lot describer, we were required by law to NOT photo our stamps at full size. We could photo them larger or smaller (and by a specified amount, like 75% of original or smaller, but I cannot remember the specifics today) so the photos in the catalogs couldn't be cut out and used as postage. That didn't hold for demonetized issues, but we lived by those rules for everything anyway. Is that different now?? Or are these reproductions only of demonetized issues?

I believe all reproductions should be clearly marked as such - on the back anyway. It is not up to me or anyone else here to set the level of expertise that should be able to tell a fake from an original on sight.

Of course there are unscrupulous people out there. That is a whole other topic that has been discussed a zillion times here. For those reproducers that are trying to bring rarities/scarcities to the general collecting public, though, they should be marking their work so as not to deceive on genuineness.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
1104 Posts
Posted 01/06/2022   2:52 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add DrewM to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Lots of things get copied or "faked," including clothing and accessories (Ever bought a ripoff handbag, well my wife has), jewelry (not just fake Rolexes), artwork, ad infinitum. People do like fakes. They give ordinary people the chance to be like the rich live in some small way.

Educating ourselves is probably the best way to know what you're buying. But, sure, with stamps it's easy to get fooled, and some less well-informed collectors will get fooled. No doubt about it. Ideally, all those fakes or copies would be indelibly stamped on the back with "copy" or "reproduction" or something. Until some novice stamps a genuine stamp with that word and regrets it! It's hard to know what to do.

The usual advice is not to buy copies because that rewards people who sell copies. But my feeling, as noted above, is that nearly all copies are easily identifiable as copies, and I would like something in the empty spaces. So I'm not bothered by that business. In fact, I kind of wish they'd up their game and make better-looking copies, given how awful so many of them are. As long as they're stamped with "copy" on the back, of course. And if they aren't, I will.

With today's technologies, making copies of stamps isn't very hard. There are two Danish stamps I'll never own whose blank spaces bothered me for so long that I printed out copies of them on my home printer -- in their actual size -- but in black and white, not color. Then I cut them out and mounted them in the empty spaces. That's how deep and serious my addiction is! No one will ever mistake them for the real thing, but this points out how appealing filling a space with a copy can be for those addicted! In any case, very few of the "stamps I'll never own" have reproductions of them for sale since reproductions are generally made of famous stamps more than just expensive stamps. Even the U.S. Postal Service couldn't resist the appeal of the 24c upside-down airplane that is so famous. It's so appealing, they reproduced it themselves! With some changes, of course. It's just too appealing to stop.

I can't see any solution to the problem of people selling copies of stamps. And if we're careful to mark any we encounter with "copy" that will help. As for others being misled, that problem is unsolvable, I'm afraid, since it's an education problem that relies on experience with stamps and effort by the collector to know what's real and what's not, neither of which skill you can force other collectors to have.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Valued Member
United States
475 Posts
Posted 01/06/2022   3:02 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add joe1225us to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I suspect that Drews opinion will be unpopular. So I will join in to second it. I don't have the kind of money that would allow me a full set of Colombians etc. And I want one! I would be satisfied with a good looking replica. Of course it should be stamped (or watermarked)'Replica'. Bu why should I or all the other collectors be denied the pleasure of a beautiful set of Trans Mississippi because we are not wealthy?
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
United States
1492 Posts
Posted 01/06/2022   5:50 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Parcelpostguy to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
why should I or all the other collectors be denied the pleasure of a beautiful set of Trans Mississippi Rolex GMT Master II Ice because we are not wealthy?


'cause knockoffs are illegal {Edit} in the USA?

By the way, if you cannot afford a used set of the 1998 Trans Mississippi stamps in the intended colors of issue, perhaps stamp collecting is a bit too rich for your pursuits. Some hobbies are just like that. Look at Larry Ellison and one of his hobbies, even he lost the America's Cup in 2017 after a spectacular come from behind, down 1-8, to win 9-8 in 2013. Except for just a few dozen folks worldwide, the hobby and beauty of racing for the America's Cup is out of reach.

Now Ellison can go sulk on most anywhere on Lanai, Hawaii's sixth-largest island; he just cannot do it without permission on the 2% of the island he could not buy.

Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by Parcelpostguy - 01/06/2022 5:59 pm
Pillar Of The Community
United States
1492 Posts
Posted 01/06/2022   6:01 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Parcelpostguy to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I don't see important details... most importantly whether or not each 'stamp' is indelibly marked faux, or replica on the back (or inconspicuously on the front).


Such may not be the law in Greece where these fakes originate.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Learn More...
9021 Posts
Posted 01/06/2022   6:23 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rogdcam to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
By the way, if you cannot afford a used set of the 1998 Trans Mississippi stamps in the intended colors of issue, perhaps some facets of stamp collecting is are a bit too rich for your pursuits.


Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Valued Member
United States
475 Posts
Posted 01/06/2022   6:26 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add joe1225us to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
'cause knockoffs are illegal {Edit} in the USA?

By the way, if you cannot afford a used set of the 1998 Trans Mississippi stamps in the intended colors of issue, perhaps stamp collecting is a bit too rich for your pursuits. Some hobbies are just like that. Look at Larry Ellison and one of his hobbies, even he lost the America's Cup in 2017 after a spectacular come from behind, down 1-8, to win 9-8 in 2013. Except for just a few dozen folks worldwide, the hobby and beauty of racing for the America's Cup is out of reach


We are discussing morality, not legality. And an additive that anyone who dose not have $5,000 for a set a Trans Mississippi shouldn't collect is not one that bears well for the future of the hobby. Philately may be the 'Hobby of Kings', but not ONLY Kings.

Obviously, as mentioned , this is assuming that each copy is marked so the unwary cannot be fleeced
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by joe1225us - 01/06/2022 6:27 pm
Pillar Of The Community
United States
1034 Posts
Posted 01/06/2022   6:29 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add mootermutt987 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
If we are going to be honest about it, if they are not marked 'fake' in some way, then they are being made to, ultimately, deceive. If the intent is to bring the beauty and splendor of the unaffordable to the masses, then why not mark it as fake on the back??? Other than to deceive, in some way, at some point, in the end???
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
United States
3087 Posts
Posted 01/06/2022   7:25 pm  Show Profile Check eyeonwall's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add eyeonwall to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Consider the person who inherits a collection that includes replicas. Unless they are marked replica in the album or unless they were pointedly told they are replicas by the collector, they will be in for s rude awakening when trying to sell the collection or worse will decide the buyer is trying to rip them off.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Valued Member
United States
475 Posts
Posted 01/06/2022   8:06 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add joe1225us to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Consider the person who inherits a collection that includes replicas. Unless they are marked replica in the album or unless they were pointedly told they are replicas by the collector, they will be in for s rude awakening when trying to sell the collection or worse will decide the buyer is trying to rip them off.


I think EVERYONE will agree that all copies should be clearly and permanently marked as such
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Valued Member
United States
475 Posts
Posted 01/06/2022   8:40 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add joe1225us to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here is a general observation. The internet make replicas available in a way that wouldn't have occurred otherwise. Prior to the internet, they were not and could not be readily available. Reason being there is a very niche market for them; stamp collectors. Prior to the internet, the only way to reach collectors was through the varicose publications. None of which would run an ad for replicas, whether legal or not. I still remember the brouhaha in the early 80s, when some one tried to advertise stamp repair and reguming services. And it isn't worth the effort to make replicas for the few you can peddle yourself. So while 20% of all collectors might want to buy them, there was no way to distribute them. But the internet (and eBay etc) allows access to a wide range of collectors, without going through the door keeper of respectable philately. And 20% of all collectors is a huge market!
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
United States
1092 Posts
Posted 01/07/2022   10:30 am  Show Profile Check ray.mac's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add ray.mac to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
By the way, if you cannot afford a used set of the 1998 Trans Mississippi stamps in the intended colors of issue, perhaps stamp collecting is a bit too rich for your pursuits.


This happened in a way, to me about 15 years ago-- I got to the point with the Washington Franklin 2c reds and coils where I wasn't going to spend (or couldn't afford, or wasn't willing to afford) for a 388, 539, etc., and also didn't trust the series because of all of the fakery. And I didn't want to spend for the high value Columbians and the Zeps.

So, I still wanted to collect U.S. at the time, and found another interest-- and very affordable, chasing the 3c 1861 shades, then plating the 1c 1857.

So I would amend PPG's thoughts by saying that at some point, everything becomes unaffordable for everyone other than a very select few, and if one is still passionate about this great hobby, there are plenty of other places to look or to pivot to, well within the umbrella of U.S. Classics.

Hope this is helpful...Ray
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Page: of 2 Previous TopicReplies: 23 / Views: 1,846Next Topic  
Next Page
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.


Go to Top of Page
Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Stamp Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2022 Stamp Community Family - All rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Stamp Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Privacy Policy / Terms of Use    Advertise Here
Stamp Community Forum © 2007 - 2022 Stamp Community Forums
It took 0.25 seconds to lick this stamp. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05