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Great Scott, It's A Disaster!

 
 
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Posted 10/09/2016   5:23 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add GregAlex to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
With Hurricane Matthew petering out, I thought it might be a good time to start a disasterous topic -- Disasters! Natural or man-made, these often made eye-catching subjects for postcards. Who can resist a good train wreck?







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Posted 10/09/2016   5:37 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jkelley01938 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Believe it or not, I always keep trash bags real close by in case of emergency evacuation.

Jack Kelley
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Posted 10/09/2016   6:30 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add littleriverphil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Down town Point Arena, Mendocino County, 100 miles north of San Francisco after the 1906 earthquake. Post Office is still standing!
The red x down next to Halliday's Livery is GGrand pa Ainsely's harness shop.


The top of main street, Point Arena.



3 Miles north of town, the Point Arena Light didn't fare so well, and was totaled, But was rebuilt in 18 months.


A View of the light in 1885 for comparison. This is a photo, not a post card.







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Edited by littleriverphil - 10/09/2016 9:23 pm
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Posted 10/16/2016   12:48 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add GregAlex to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
This card is something of a mystery. It appears to depict a sea view of a volcanic eruption along a coast. The postcard has no caption, but it's printed in English on the back. I did a little digging and there was an eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 1906 and the volcano is right along the coast of Italy. Any other thoughts?

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Posted 10/16/2016   02:06 am  Show Profile Check 51studebaker's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add 51studebaker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
1883 eruption of the volcano on the island of Krakatoa?
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Australia
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Posted 10/16/2016   03:18 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jjarmstrong47 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
It looks like cards I've seen from Vesuvius. There is a similar picture here: http://tickingbombpompeii.weebly.com/
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Collecting postal history of WW2 in Italy, Chicago precancels and world-wide line engraved. http://www.engravedstamps.net
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Posted 11/01/2016   8:56 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add GregAlex to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
While the 1906 San Francisco quake is well-documented on postcards, here's one that isn't: the Great Yokohama Earthquake of 1923. At magnitude 7.9, this was actually a little more powerful than the San Fran quake and far more deadly. In SF, only 3,000 deaths were reported. In Yokohama more than 100,000 perished, with perhaps 40,000 missing. This postcard actually shows remarkably little damage.

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Posted 12/01/2016   12:14 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add GregAlex to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
A little more than a year after the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco, the city suffered another blow. The beloved Cliff House restaurant burned to the ground on Sept. 7, 1907. But damage and destruction was nothing new in the history of the Cliff House, which had been rebuilt four times previously. Within two years the current incarnation was built. It still stands and is currently run by the National Park Service as part of Golden Gate National Recreation Area.





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Posted 01/02/2017   12:38 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Joe2007 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Recently acquired this one!

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Posted 06/25/2019   12:39 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add HoosRec to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Joe2007, That Hamilton, Ohio, postcard is probably depicting the Great Flood of 1913 that inundated much of Ohio and Indiana as well as parts of surrounding states. There are hundreds of real photo postcard views of that flood in Indiana and I suspect there are many hundreds more views of the flooding in Ohio.
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Posted 06/26/2019   07:57 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add HoosRec to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
A description of the Great Flood of 1913 was provided in the C. C. C. & St. L. (Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis) Railway Annual Report for that year. It was published in the following publication and a couple of quoted excerpts follow.

Railway Age Gazette, Volume 56 (New York, NY: Simmons-Boardman Publishing Company, 1914), page 968.

The operation of the property for the first two months of the year indicated a substantial gain over the 1912 results, but the disastrous floods in Ohio, Indiana and Illinois in March caused a suspension of operation of much of the railroad for about thirty days, doing damage to the property of this company that will entail an outlay of about $3,000,000 in the restoration of roadway, bridges, buildings, etc.

Rain began to fall over the Ohio Valley Sunday, March 23, and continued until March 27. The rainfall was general over the entire valley, but much heavier in the states of Ohio and Indiana, where it varied according to location. At Marietta, Ohio, the rainfall was only 2.7 inches, while at Bellefontaine, Ohio, it was 11.2 inches, the average rainfall in Ohio and Indiana being something like 7.8 inches.

It was the unprecedented rainfall for the forty-eight hours ending Tuesday morning, March 25, that caused the extreme high water in the Great Miami, Scioto, Wabash, White, Blue, White Water and Sandusky Rivers. The Great Miami exceeded all previous records at various points by from 7.7 feet to 13.6 feet, the White Water by from 11 to 14 feet, while practically every stream in the two states was reported higher than any previous record.

This was followed in a few days by the rising of the Ohio to within a few inches of its highest record, cutting off all traffic for ten days at Cincinnati, damaging the tracks at Lawrenceburg and overflowing that place. A line drawn around the outermost points where bridges were gone or the line cut embraced 1,230 miles of road of this company. The greater part of the damage to this company's property occurred within a radius of 125 miles of Cincinnati, Ohio. A total of 38 bridges were either totally or partially destroyed, necessitating rebuilding including 3 across the Miami River, 2 across the Mad River, 4 across the White Water River and 2 across the White River. About 50 miles of track and embankment were washed out, varying from 1 to 25 feet in depth, and the combination freight and passenger depots at Brookville, Indiana; New Trenton, Indiana and Cedar Grove, Indiana were washed away. Interlocking plants at Dayton, Ohio; Columbus Ohio, and Indianapolis, Indiana, were considerably damaged.



Although it will be evident that it is difficult to estimate the effect of the disaster upon the operation, both within and without the zone of the flood (which effect continued to a greater or less extent throughout the remainder of the year), the resulting increase in transportation expenses is estimated at $400,000, bringing the total of loss and damage to this company's property and business attributable to the flood well above $5,000,000.


In Indianapolis, the U. S. Weather Bureau includes the following in its records of the event for Logansport. "March 21, 1913 .54 inches; March 22, 1913 00 inches; March 23, 1913 .45 inches; March 24, 1913 2.30 inches; March 25, 1913 1.97 inches; March 26, 1913 rain gauge washed away by flood and no further record available."


This postcard image is from my Flickr album of 1913 flood postcards. That album contains 76 Indiana postcards plus several close-ups of some of those postcards. This image shows the C. & O. and Pennsylvania railroad bridges that were destroyed by the flood at Muncie, Indiana. This link will take you to that album.

https://flic.kr/s/aHsjsHvjzb

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Edited by HoosRec - 06/26/2019 08:02 am
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Posted 06/27/2019   11:11 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add GregAlex to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
What a great history lesson! I had never heard of the 1913 flooding.
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Posted 06/28/2019   01:17 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add gslaten to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The original Palace Hotel in San Francisco, destroyed by fire as the result of the 1906 earthquake. A very interesting history with photos, including this one, can be found here. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palac...an_Francisco





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Edited by gslaten - 06/28/2019 01:18 am
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Posted 06/28/2019   01:35 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add HoosRec to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
GregAlex: "What a great history lesson! I had never heard of the 1913 flooding."

It was obviously a significant event for the Ohio River Valley, but most of my baby boomer generation don't seem to know about it.

I don't know how much media attention it received beyond this region. The level of attention would have depended upon what else was going on in the world at the time. I don't know, but wouldn't be surprised to learn that many newspapers in this region didn't get published during the flood. But, I'll bet they covered it thoroughly once they got the presses running again. Judging by the number of postcards produced, there must have been thousands of photos taken in Indiana alone.
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Posted 06/28/2019   6:13 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add GregAlex to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Nice SF card, gslaten. Btw, there is an extensive thread on the 1906 San Francisco earthquake you might enjoy:
http://goscf.com/t/33058
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Posted 06/29/2019   02:03 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add gslaten to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi GregAlex, thanks for pointing out that thread. Very interesting.

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